Patricia Racette makes us believe in her utterly as she veers between the desperation of being downtrodden in a loveless marriage to the triumph of controlling her own destiny back to the twin despairs of imprisonment and sexual betrayal, making Katerina’s extreme actions seem inevitable to us in the audience. Read the full story…

Don’t miss this rave on Patricia’s unveiling of her first Katerina.. London’s West End calls her “sensational… a star!” Read the review!

Don’t miss Patricia’s latest TOSCA with the Detroit Symphony’s first outing of this Puccini with Leonard Slatkin at the podium– Patricia calls the brass alone ‘bone-rattling’ in the magnificent opening chords! Stream on this Sunday at 3 p.m. EST at http://www.dso.org/live.aspx!TOSCAADV_164_150

Patricia Racette delivers a fine performance as Nedda in Pagliacci, fiery in her aria “Stridono lassu” and sultry in her love scenes with Silvio, making out on the running board of the truck. Read more…

But as Nedda, the luminous Patricia Racette is an optimist in spite of everything, her bright soprano spinning buoyantly in her duet with the orchestral birds in “Stridono lassù.” Still, Ms. Racette is ready to switch into play-acting whenever she must. Read more and check out Cory Weaver’s great photo of Patricia!

…as Canio’s wife, Nedda, who has become involved with the villager Silvio, she sang with beguiling feistiness, sizable sound and great character. She looked charming and captured the suffocating young woman’s restlessness.

Patricia Racette as the doomed Nedda gives one of her finest performances in recent memory, finding focus and honey in her middle range. She wholly inhabits her role, playing the wanton scamp “Colombina” with aplomb, but earnestly yearning to be free of her life with Canio. Even in the midst of her infidelity, she commands sympathy… Read more!

Check out the article and pics of Patricia and Patti Lupone for L.A. Opera’s new production of GHOSTS OF VERSAILLES! Opening this Saturday, February 7 and running through March 1.

…The much-anticipated star of the show is Metropolitan Opera star soprano Patricia Racette, in her first staged Salome. In my recent interview with her, she says that she planned to “go for it”—and that she does. She completely inhabits the character, but her own way.
…Racette is beautiful in her slinky dress and sparkly sandals, but it is her every movement that conveys a girlishness on the edge of womanhood. READ ON!

…Racette delivered the goods, her luxuriously gleaming instrument riding easily above the large orchestra and staying fresh to the very end.

..She performed the Dance of the Seven Veils with convincing lasciviousness and, at its nude conclusion, a figure that any stripper could envy. READ THE FULL ARTICLE!